Tag Archives: blog

US Charities’ Adoption of Social Media

4 Sep

Study by

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Center for Marketing Research

Objective

To compare the organizational adoption of social media of the largest 200 US charities in 2007, 2008 and 2009.These 200 charities were chosen from the list of  Forbes Magazine.

Data depend on the detailed interviews with executives of 76 charities (that responded) from that list.

Highlights

Charities still outpacing other sectors in adoption of social media (See the graphs in the  manuscript below).

97% of charities are using some form of social media.

65% of the organizations are blogging. Most improvement when comparing the data from 2007, 2008 and 2009.

42% report that social media is very important for their fund-raising  strategy.

The study online

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35 Social Media Marketing Articles

21 Aug

Below  is a neat and delicious post from a social media and internet marketing blog: Traffikd.

The author lists his favourite 35 articles on social media and internet marketing.

The better part is that he classifies them into categories which makes the list smooth as follows:

Strategy

Stumble on

Digg

Fark

Linkbait

Analytics

Content Development

Professional Services

Tools/Resources

General Social Media

My Top3 from this list are below:

50 Ways to Use Social Media, Listed by Objective

5 Steps to Become a Better Social Media Marketer

How to Have a Constant Flow of Ideas

Enjoy this post by clicking on the image below:

Examining the Medical Blogosphere: An Online Survey of Medical Bloggers

8 Aug

Ivor Kovic1, MD; Ileana Lulic1, MD; Gordana Brumini2, PhD

1Rijeka University School of Medicine, Croatia
2Department of Medical Informatics, Rijeka University School of Medicine, Croatia

ikovic [at] medri.hr

Journal of Medical Internet Research 2008

ABSTRACT

Background: Blogs are the major contributors to the large increase of new websites created each year. Most blogs allow readers to leave comments and, in this way, generate both conversation and encourage collaboration. Despite their popularity, however, little is known about blogs or their creators.
Objectives: To contribute to a better understanding of the medical blogosphere by investigating the characteristics of medical bloggers and their blogs, including bloggers’ Internet and blogging habits, their motivations for blogging, and whether or not they follow practices associated with journalism.
Methods: We approached 197 medical bloggers of English-language medical blogs which provided direct contact information, with posts published within the past month. The survey included 37 items designed to evaluate data about Internet and blogging habits, blog characteristics, blogging motivations, and, finally, the demographic data of bloggers.
Pearson’s Chi-Square test was used to assess the significance of an association between 2 categorical variables. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was utilized to reveal the relationship between participants’ ages, as well as the number of maintained blogs, and their motivation for blogging. The Mann-Whitney U test was employed to reveal relationships between practices associated with journalism and participants’ characteristics like gender and pseudonym use.
Results: A total of 80 (42%) of 197 eligible participants responded. The majority of responding bloggers were white (75%), highly educated (71% with a Masters degree or doctorate), male (59%), residents of the United States (72%), between the ages of 30 and 49 (58%), and working in the healthcare industry (67%). Most of them were experienced bloggers, with 23% (18/80) blogging for 4 or more years, 38% (30/80) for 2 or 3 years, 32% (26/80) for about a year, and only 7% (6/80) for 6 months or less. Those who received attention from the news media numbered 66% (53/80). When it comes to best practices associated with journalism, the participants most frequently reported including links to original source of material and spending extra time verifying facts, while rarely seeking permission to post copyrighted material. Bloggers who have published a scientific paper were more likely to quote other people or media than those who have never published such a paper (U= 506.5, n1= 41, n2= 35, P= .016). Those blogging under their real name more often included links to original sources than those writing under a pseudonym (U= 446.5, n1= 58, n2= 19, P= .01). Major motivations for blogging were sharing practical knowledge or skills with others, influencing the way others think, and expressing oneself creatively.
Conclusions: Medical bloggers are highly educated and devoted blog writers, faithful to their sources and readers. Sharing practical knowledge and skills, as well as influencing the way other people think, were major motivations for blogging among our medical bloggers. Medical blogs are frequently picked up by mainstream media; thus, blogs are an important vehicle to influence medical and health policy.

You can read the full article free by clicking on the image below.

This study will encourage and motivate the medical bloggers around the world like myself.